Tag Archives: GPU terrain

GPU Terrain, Part III

Finally, all the kinks have been worked out (at least for now...) of the GPU terrain engine.  Borders are totally seamless, so there are no longer any visible artifacts of the chunk boundaries (note that those first-order discontinuities in the screenshot are from the Voronoi Noise, not the terrain engine!).  Looks pretty smooth!  I've also got a system in place that should allow for some advanced semi-global heightmap effects like erosion, though I've yet to really put it to the test.

Great! Now, shall we make it adaptive? *shivers*

GPU Terrain, Part II

Implementing normal mapping really helped the appearance of the terrain - they can push the effective resolution of the terrains up by a factor of at least 16 or so. The screen shot this time is from a demo that runs at 60 fps on my laptop, unlike the previous one (which ran at ~10 fps on my laptop).

In addition, I've found that Voronoi noise (aka Worley noise) makes a very compelling basis function for the terrain!

GPU Terrain

I've finally admitted it to myself: CPU-based terrain generation just isn't smart, and it'll probably get crushed by all things GPU-based in the future. Sure, it makes threading and precision easier to deal with, but it doesn't make sense that my current terrain takes about the same amount of time to generate on my Intel HD Graphics-driven laptop and my 560GTX-powered desktop. Why on earth are all those processors going to waste?

So, here we go. My second endeavor into GPU-based terrain generation. I've already come farther than last time, when I gave it all up because of cracks that I thought were the result of GPU precision problems. I managed to solve the crack problem this time. Of course, my skirts were hiding the problems, but it still made me uneasy that tiles didn't line up perfectly - luckily, a little math solved that.

It may look like the screenshot is a regression from my previous shot, but, since it's GPU-generated, it definitely represents a step in a direction that I think will ultimately prove to be a worthwhile investment in the future of XDX's terrain engine. The terrain below is obviously simple: just a single layer of iterated value noise. Building up layers is the next step, and should be relatively easy with a few shaders.