Rhythmic Shells

January 14, 2010 General News, Ideas 1 Comment

With the contour grammar engine in development, I am still searching for ways to simplify and optimize grammatical representations. At the moment, the most restrictive element of the engine is the separation between rhythm and pitch. In current engines, the two are completely separated into different streams driven by different grammar sets. Not only does this approach render it difficult to work with both streams at the same time, but it also negatively impacts the ability of the engine to produce coherence between pitch and rhythm.

A new idea I call "rhythmic shells," however, might promise an enormous simplification of the process, combining both streams into one while offering greatly improved coherence potential at the same time. The method focuses on stripping pitch words of all length dependency and transforming rhythm into a specification of pitch words. In essence, a rhythmic "shell" is selected, which contains a prescribed number of "slots," each with a distinct duration, and the slots are then filled with pitch words. The method requires that pitch words be functions rather than definitions - that is, they must be of arbitrary length and cannot be precomputed.

Here's a simple diagram of the method:

The shell stream can be specified with a simple data structure like this:

13:2,4,5
15:2,8,6
13:2,4,6

The number on the left side indicates the index of the pitch shell to be used, while the comma-delimited numbers indicate the indices of the pitch functions with which to fill each shell slot. Notice that the phrase produced by a shell can be variated by leaving one or more elements intact while changing the others, creating a different, but still somewhat similar phrase. This will certainly guarantee more coherence.

It is worth noting that, given the functional nature of the pitch words in this description, the method of rhythmic shells if very much like a generalized method of curve-splicing, which was discussed several weeks ago!

In the next few days I put a great deal of work into the contour grammar engine to try to implement the method of rhythmic shells. I also hope to continue finding new innovations for the simplification, unification, and overall improvement of grammar techniques.